Reduced Speech Form in the American English Pronunciation

I’m sure you’ve heard a lot wanna, gonna, gotta, dunno, oughta, kinda, lotta, and many more in American English pronunciation. That’s how the Americans speak in everyday conversation. I’ll have to remind you that these forms are used only in spoken English and not in written.

Watch this video and listen to how the reduced speech form is used in day-to-day speech in America, even the President of the United States used it a lot in his presidential speech.

When you finish watching the video try to pronounce each of the following sentence using reduction. I’m gonna give you three examples. Did you notice I just used reduction in that sentence? I reduced going to as gonna.

1. I don’t want to go to the party because it sounds boring.

I don’t wanna go to the party cuz it sounds boring. I reduced want to as wanna and because as cuz.

2. You could have gone with me, if you had told me in plenty of time.

You coulda gone with me, if youd told me in plenty ef time. I reduced could have as coulda, you had as youd, and of as ef with a schwa.

3. How are you doing?

Howarya doin’? I reduced how are you  as howarya and doing as doin’. Did you see I didn’t pronounce the -ng sound in doiNG?

Now try the following sentences yourself:

1. I was so hungry, I could have eaten a horse. (I was so hungry, I couldav eaten a horse.)

2. Did you like the film? (Didja like the film?)

3. I’m going to do my homework now. (I’m gonna do my homework now.)

4. I don’t know what to think about that. (I dunno what to think bout that.)

5. I’m kind of worried about that test. (I’m kinda worried bout the test.)

6. What kinds of clothes does that shop sell? (What kindsa clothes does that shop sell?)

7. I have got a lot of respect for that guy. (I‘ve got a lotta respect for that guy.)

8. You ought to know more about that than me. (You oughta know more bout that than me.)

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