Using English Expressions in a Converstion

 

Read the following conversation:

Karen : Hi, Janet. I haven’t heard from you in a while. How are you?

Janet : I’ve been feeling under the weather. I felt blah in the morning. Then by the afternoon I was as sick as a dog. I started running a fever and actually thought I was going to pass out! Finally I had Brad take me to the doctor who said it was a bad case of the flu which just has to run its course. I should be raring to go soon.

Karen : Well, it sounds like you’ll pull through. It takes a while to bounce back after having the flu, but I’m sure you’ll be back in the pink soon. Just try to take it easy for a while.

Janet : You’re right, but I’m too antsy to just lie in bed. I got bored out of my mind.

Karen : I know what you mean. The last time I was sick, I started to go stir crazy.

 

Do you know the meaning of the highlighted idioms and phrases in the dialogs? I’m sure some of them are new to your ears.

Sometimes or maybe most of the times the non-native speakers have problem understanding what the native English speakers are saying because they often use idioms, slang, and phrases that all Greek to you.

Don’t feel embarrassed to ask them what’s the meaning of this and that whenever you hear unfamiliar words or phrases they use when they speak to you. You can ask them back by saying:

“Huh? What’s that again?”

“I don’t know what you mean?”

“What does it mean?”

“What’s that supposed to mean?”

Or just by repeating the exact word(s) they use, for example, you don’t know the meaning of “all Greek to you”, simply repeat that expression in question: “All Greek to you?” The native speakers will gladly explain the meaning of that idiom to you; it means you know nothing about it/them. They understand you perfectly because they know English is not your native tongue.

So in this article, I’ve come up with some English expressions that I’m sure some of you are not familiar with them. I want you to take notes of the expressions you see in the dialogs and practice using them in your daily conversation.

 

The meaning of the highlighted idioms and phrases in the conversation:

feeling under the weather = feeling sick

blah = llifeless

as sick as a dog = extremely sick

running a fever = getting a fever

pass out = to faint

run its course = to lose strength on its own

raring to go = full of energy

pull through = to survive

bounce back = to recover

in the pink = in good health

take it easy = to relax

antsy = restless

bored out of my mind = extremely bored

go stir crazy = to become very restless being confined to one place

 

Translation of the Conversation:

Karen : Hi, Janet. I haven’t heard from you in a while. How are you?

Janet : I’ve been feeling sick. I felt lifeless in the morning. Then by the afternoon I was extremely sick. I started getting a fever and actually thought I was going to faint! Finally I had Brad take me to the doctor who said it was a bad case of the flu which just has to lose its strength on its own. I should be full of energy soon.

Karen : Well, it sounds like you’ll survive. It takes a while to recover after having the flu, but I’m sure you’ll be back in good health soon. Just try to relax for a while.

Janet : You’re right, but I’m too restless to just lie in bed. I got extremely bored.

Karen : I know what you mean. The last time I was sick, I started to become very restless.

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