American English Pronunciation: February and Colonel

Dear February, I’m in need of an R, and you don’t seem to be using yours. May i borrow it? Sincerely, Colonel Confused? Well, don’t be. Let me explain it to you. The common pronunciation for most Americans is /ˈfe-byə-ˌwer-ē/. The first r in Feb(r)uary is dropped. They simply don’t like to have two r’s… Read More American English Pronunciation: February and Colonel

Reduction Mistakes: “Wanna” or “Wantsta”

Do you have problem understanding when a native speaker talk to you? It’s probably because native English speakers often reduce their speech; their speech seems to run together. It sounds like the native speakers always speak fast. Well, they don’t always do that; they speak in normal speed, but they squeeze the words, shrink them… Read More Reduction Mistakes: “Wanna” or “Wantsta”

Useful Expressions: “Take After” & “Like Chalk and Cheese”

  “Take after” is a phrasal verb, meaning to look or behave like an older relative. Each of your parents gave you some of their physical and personality traits, but sometimes you don’t look like any of them. You take after your grandmother or grandfather instead. “Like chalk and cheese“ is an idiom that you can use… Read More Useful Expressions: “Take After” & “Like Chalk and Cheese”